Let's Make CNC Machining Attractive Again

Let's Make CNC Machining Attractive Again

Through federal aid, it’s possible to make U.S. manufacturing attractive again for future generations, and save the industry from a waging skills gap and a devastating hit to the economy.

Without constant innovation, the manufacturing industry is bound for certain death. In last week’s blog, we recognized that U.S. labor productivity has grown at an average annual rate of 1.3% - the lowest average recorded to date. Additionally, a recent study conducted by Deloitte and the Manufacturing Institute stated that more than half of the 4.6 million manufacturing jobs created over the next ten years will go unfulfilled, thanks to the industry skills gap. Manufacturing companies have attempted to recruit more skilled workers by offering competitive wages and extensive training and support, yet a majority of younger generation individuals avoid manufacturing jobs due to industry and career misconceptions. Careers in manufacturing stand out as good-paying opportunities, especially for those without advanced degrees, but without active efforts to destigmatize these careers, the manufacturing industry is ill-fated – which is a huge problem for the U.S. economy.

Thankfully, The Century Foundation proposed a federal agenda for revitalizing America’s manufacturing communities, which includes advocating for increasing the pipeline of qualified workers in manufacturing. A strong recommendation stated by the CTF is to provide federal grants for career-based K-12 programs targeting manufacturing. By introducing career awareness at a young age, children are less likely to buy into the stigma associated with manufacturing jobs. They will become more aware of what actually happens on a machine shop floor, and how they can be involved with robotics, software programming, and advancing technology, instead of repetitive, mundane tasks in dimly lit facilities. Eligible programs would include work-based learning and active engagement of industry professionals, along with attainment of industry-recognized credentials, with preferences for aid given to communities with high levels of unemployment. Through federal aid, it’s possible to make U.S. manufacturing attractive again for future generations, and save the industry from a waging skills gap and a devastating hit to the economy.

Personal advice?
US Personal Advice